Overview of Ongoing Research on Cotton in California

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Despite reduced acreage in recent years, research in California cotton is alive and well.  In fact, with the establishment of a coordinated research meeting held every September, research in California cotton is as strong and harmonized as it has ever been.  Growers, Gin Managers and industry leaders come together in September to review research proposals on California cotton and make sure that funds are spent wisely and effectively in a coordinated manner.  This ensures what limited resources the industry does have are stretched to the maximum extent possible to keep California cotton in the forefront.

Research dollars are focused on addressing California cotton’s most pressing needs as identified by the industry at this time.

They are in order of ranking:

  1. Diseases (FOV resistance, variety screening, seed and soil treatments, pathology work in lab and field plus Seedling Disease issues)
  2. Sticky Cotton (Development of better detection and measurement system and standards and continue educational efforts)
  3. Contamination (Research ways to detect plastic in the seed cotton and eliminate where possible)
  4. Insect Management and Control (Efficacy screening of new and old products and promote intro of new chemistries with low VOC, focus on Lygus and Aphid control)
  5. Water Management (Regional with varying soil types and irrigation methods with emphasis on efficiencies, conservation, nitrogen, and salt management)
  6. Weed Management (Resistance Management to existing products and introduction of new chemistries)
  7. Nutrient Management (Focus on nutrient management while taking into account factors of soil type, irrigation method, efficiencies, etc.)type, irrigation method, efficiencies, etc.)

Funds from Cotton Incorporated (CI), the California Cotton Alliance (CCA), and the California Cotton Ginners and Growers Association (CCGGA) are coordinated and used to fund this critical research.  Funds from CCGGA come through an assessment on cotton planting seed by the California Crop Improvement Association (CCIA).

The following are papers on the most recent research as compiled by CCGGA.  Please take this opportunity to thoroughly review this document and come to understand how growers’ money is being spent to preserve the California cotton industry and help address its biggest challenges.